Developments in blockchain tech


  • Hey!

    I've created this topic as one specifically dedicated to advances in the use of blockchain technology. I will start off with an article via Quartz:

    Guardtime is helping Estonia move its citizens’ health records to a database, based on blockchain technology, that nobody can mess with. Whenever someone’s health records are accessed, that “event” is recorded on the blockchain, alongside what information was changed or added. Estonia will be the first country to use blockchain this way, according to a press release issued today (March 3).

    Read more here.

    Information posted above is intended as a general guide and does not constitute legal advice.


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  • Excellent new topic Tark!

    I am re-posting mine which was buried under the general category...

    ANYONE HAVING ANYTHING TO DO WITH BLOCKCHAINS WILL ALSO WANT TO HAVE ESTONIAN E-RESIDENCY" ! Lyn Bell 1March2016

    The two together create an excellent balance between ... trust and decentralized ledgers ... without compromising privacy and identity.



  • PS. Our vision for eResNetwork is to build the safest networking platform where users are actually the ones to fully control their own data (similarly to health record example). Meaning that you could always see who has checked your personal account, even if you contact the eResNetwork support team, you will see that John Smith from eResNetwork has checked your profile. Or that Mike Brandon from FBI has checked your public profile. I think the world needs a better platform than LinkedIn and Facebook that have the full control over your data and are eager to sell it any time they wish.

    Erik Ehasoo
    Skype / twitter: erikehasoo
    www.rubiksdigital.com



  • While not directly related to blockchain tech, data protection is indeed an interesting topic. However, Erik, I am not sure if the approach you described is the best. For example, consider the following scenario. For some time now, traders are required to provide consumers with certain information regarding the protection and rights of consumers. However, as time goes on, these requirements have grown longer and longer and by now, may oftentimes exceed one page. The irony in the whole process is that the longer the consumer information provided, the less likely it is that the consumer will actually read it.

    I am afraid that the same logic as brought forward in the above example may also apply in the case of data protection. While a lot of consumers are more than happy to tinker around with the limited data protection controls that facebook and google give them, I find it highly unlikely that anyone but a "tech nerd" would ever feel the need to take the initiative of contacting eResNetwork in order to find out who has visited their profile (as an example). The same applies in other fields, people don't really care who accesses personal data that they themselves consider unimportant, even though someone with access to a lot of such data may draw significant inferences even from the limited, "unimportant", data available. I find it a bit optimistic to expect the "average Joe" to be able to and interested in assessing the importance of any given data and the publication of that, especially if they are given a full control board to fully customize the sharing of their data. Therefore, I find that the default settings will always remain more important than whatever controls a data subject is given with regard to the processing of their data.

    Information posted above is intended as a general guide and does not constitute legal advice.



  • Thanks for your thorough insights! However I didn't quite get why it is a bad idea...? Regarding the lack of interest from users - this might be expected. Me myself have never before checked who have accessed my data on Estonian x-road but the fact that I have the chance to do it, is itself very assuring and I'm happy for this kind of transparency. Even if I mostly do not use it, I'm very satisfied that this kind of system is in place - it has raised my trust toward the system quite a lot.

    But overall, this doesn't have to be anything complicated, the user definitely doesn't have to contact us to get this info, he could easily get it from the web. To be fair, LinkedIn today also have a similar system, although limited, and you have to pay for the full information. They have been sending e-mails about it for years ("2 people have looked at your profile, see who...") and as they do, I'm sure it has quite a good retention rate, after all people are quite curious to see who is watching their profile.

    I can imagine a similar interface for eResNetwork but we should not ask money for this information.

    Erik Ehasoo
    Skype / twitter: erikehasoo
    www.rubiksdigital.com


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